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2020 PSCU
Board of Directors
 
Frederick W. Morgan
Chairperson

Jeffery King
Vice Chairperson

Dean J. Trudeau
Treasurer

Edward A. Carey, Jr.
Secretary
 
Charles Lowler
 Dale Reaume
Nora Sharpley
 
Credit Committee
Veronica Massey
Huey Ferguson
Juanita Henry
 
Social Media Tips for Parents
Tips to help your child safely engage in social media

Social media offers an opportunity to connect and share with others, but it can also expose your child to bullying, negativity and potentially dangerous individuals. The following tips will help your child safely navigate the world of social media and capitalize on its benefits.

Screen time limits

Social media at its core is designed to entertain, connect and engage users. That’s why time seems to lose all meaning when your kids are tweeting, reading, clicking and sharing. Hours can go by in what feels like a blink of an eye. To help safeguard your children’s time and encourage them to foster other interests, limit their screen time. “Unstructured and offline play stimulates creativity. Make unplugged playtime a daily priority, especially for very young children,” recommends the American Academy of Pediatrics on its blog HealthyChildren.org.

Security tips

Appearances can be deceiving on social media, and it’s important that your kids understand that just like in the real world, not everyone can be trusted. Remind them that connecting with someone they don’t know is not a safe idea. A friend request from a stranger should never be accepted and sharing pictures can be problematic, as some apps reveal to users where the photos have been taken. Remind your child to not share identifiable information such as their full name, birthdate, location or name of their school that on online predator can use to their advantage. Make sure you help your kids set the appropriate privacy settings on each of their social media accounts.

Latest apps and sites

It seems that every other second there is a new, hot social media app. With the rapidity of change, it’s hard to keep up with what apps are safe for your kids to use. Keep the line of communication between you and your children open. Ask about what apps they’re using and research them on your own. If your kids want to try a new app, tell them you need to investigate it first before they can sign up.

Forever rule

Anything your kids post will last forever in cyberspace. Even if they think they erase it or take it down, their words, comments or pictures never truly go away. What they post now can live to haunt them for years to come. Potential employers, school boards, friends and family, along with anyone else using the internet can find and judge their content.

Monitoring tips

Your kids may refuse your friend request or block you from their posts because they don’t want their social media activity monitored or they don’t want to let their friends see that you’re looking over their shoulder. You might feel hesitant to invade their privacy, but it’s important that you are keeping an eye on them. “As long as they are minors, I believe it’s wise for parents or guardians to check their children’s social media posts,” according to Psychology Today writer Tim Elmore. Apps such as DinnerTime, Norton and TeenSafe will help you keep tabs on your kids’ online activity and set limits.

Social media is a complicated outlet with many pros and cons. These tips can help your child understand how to protect themselves online and use social media to enhance their life instead of adding more stress to their development.



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Disclaimer - All content contained in this newsletter is for informational purposes only and should not be relied upon to make any financial, accounting, tax, legal or other related decisions. Each person must consider his or her objectives, risk tolerances and level of comfort when making financial decisions and should consult a competent professional advisor prior to making any such decisions. Any opinions expressed through the content in this newsletter are the opinions of the particular author only.  


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